Toshiba develops new packaging technology for silicon carbide power modules to improve reliability and reduce size

Toshiba has developed packaging technology for silicon carbide (SiC) power modules that doubles product reliability while reducing package size by 20%.

Compared with silicon, silicon carbide can achieve higher voltage and lower loss, and is widely regarded as a new generation of materials for power devices. Although currently used mainly in train inverters, it will soon be widely used in high-voltage applications such as photovoltaic power systems and automotive equipment.

Improve reliability through silver sintering technology

Toshiba develops new packaging technology for silicon carbide power modules to improve reliability and reduce size

Reliability is the main limitation of silicon carbide devices. In the application of high voltage power module, not only the semiconductor chip, the package itself must have a high degree of reliability. Toshiba has achieved its goal of effectively improving package reliability by soldering chips using a new silver (AG) sintering technology.

In current silicon carbide packages, increasing power density and switching frequency lead to degrading soldering performance, making it difficult to suppress on-chip resistance that increases over time. This degradation can be significantly reduced by silver sintering. The thermal resistance of the silver-sintered layer is only half that of the soldered layer, which allows the chips in the modules to be closer together, thereby reducing their size.

New Package for SiC Power Module (IXPLV)

Toshiba develops new packaging technology for silicon carbide power modules to improve reliability and reduce size

Toshiba has named the new technology IXPLV, and from the end of this month it will be used in the volume production of 3.3kV class silicon carbide power modules.